Sayijan & Vidya Wedding Oshwal Centre

Wedding Oshwal Centre.

Sayijan & Vidya’s Hindu wedding was held at the Oshwal Centre in Potters Bar. I have put together a little slide show of their wedding photography. I hope you enjoy it x

Wedding Gallery.


The Oshwal Centre is a beautiful wedding venue and I have added a little bit of information about it here:

Oshwal Association of the U.K. (OAUK) is the largest Jain organisation in the U.K. It was established in 1967 and registered as a charitable organisation in 1974.

History

The history of the Halari Visa Oshwal Community dates back to 457 B.C. to the state of Ossiya in Central Rajasthan, India.  The name “Oshwal” is believed to have derived from “Ossiya”.  Due to adverse conditions, Oshwals migrated to Sindh, and then Kutch and finally settled in 52 villages around Jam Nagar and became known as the Halari Visa Oshwals.  To this day, the descent of the Halari Visa Oshwals is traced by reference to one of the 52 villages in India and their “attak”, or clan name, which was derived from the founding members of the family.

The migration of the Halari Visa Oshwals to East Africa commenced in the latter part of the 1890s where they settled mainly as traders and professionals.

The earliest Oshwal settlers to the UK were in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s.  Initially an informal social group was formed and the Oshwal community saw its early beginnings. The first migration from East Africa was in 1968, often referred to as “the exodus”, which saw the community numbers increase.

A strong ethic of hard work and entrepreneurial flair has seen Oshwals establish successful businesses in virtually all sectors and professions in most fields, including; law, medicine, accountancy & financial services.

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Religion

Oshwals are largely followers of the Jain faith, an ancient religion originating from India.  Followers of the faith revere Lord Mahavir the 24th  Tirthanker (A Tirthanker is a living being who attains enlightenment).  Lord Mahavir’s teachings can be dated between 570 B.C. and 527 B.C.

The guiding principles of the Jain faith are Right Belief, Right Knowledge and Right Conduct.  One of the key tenets of the Jain faith is non-violence towards all living beings.  By practicing the basic tenets, followers of the Jain faith believe that human kind will be able to live in peace and harmony with each other and with all living beings in the Universe.

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Set Up

OAUK currently has approximately 15,000 registered members and the overall population is estimated at 25,000.  For administration purposes, the Association is divided into 9 Areas. The governance and administration of Association is dealt with by the Executive Committee and each Area is managed by an Area Committee.   Elections of both the Executive Committee and the Area Committees take place every two years.

Charity Objectives

The Charity Objectives in summary are: –

  1. The advancement of the Jain Religion in the U.K.
  2. The relief of poverty, advancement of education and the protection of health.

Venues

The Association has four venues: –

  • Oshwal Centre, Coopers Lane Road, Northaw, Hertfordshire EN6 4DG.  This is also the site of the first Shikarband Jain Temple in Europe.
  • Oshwal Mahajanwadi, 1 Campbell Road, Croydon, Surrey CR0 2SQ
  • Oshwal EKTA Centre, 366A Stag Lane, Kingsbury, London NW9 9AA
  • Oshwal Shakti Centre, Inwood Road, Hounslow, Middlesex TW13 1UX

Work carried out by OAUK

Oshwal Association of the U.K. carries out regular activities for the welfare and benefit of its members including religious activities, the running of Gujarati Schools, Adult education classes, seminars on health and welfare, events for the elderly, sports clubs for the children and various cultural and heritage programmes.

The Association also promotes charitable work and raises funds for animal welfare, education and health care for those in need. At times of natural disasters and catastrophes’ the community has raised substantial sums to assist such causes. The majority of the work is carried out  by volunteers who take time out of their professional and family lives to devote time back to the community.  Oshwals also volunteer for a large number of other charities and organisations and hold posts as school governors, magistrates etc.  Several have been recognised for their contributions and have been awarded with honours.


Some History

The history of the Halari Visa Oshwal Community commences from very humble beginnings and dates back to 457 B.C. when the state of Ossiya was founded (roughly situated in central Rajasthan in India) and the King, ministers and a large number of soldiers and their families gave up the consumption of alcohol and meat and converted to the Jain faith.

Due to adverse natural conditions, a number of these Oshwals migrated to Sindh (now Western Pakistan) in around 10th to 12th Century A.D.  The conditions being no better, they then migrated to Kutch (part of the state of Gujarat). In around the 16th Century A.D., following a dispute between two brothers of the ruling family, the Oshwals followed Jam Rawal who founded a settlement in the Halar District of Gujarat and set up his capital city, Jam Nagar.  The Oshwals settled in 52 villages around Jam Nagar and became known as the Halari Visa Oshwals.

To this day, the descent of the Halari Visa Oshwals is traced by reference to one of the 52 villages in India and their “attak”, or clan name, which was derived from the founding members of the family.

Looking for better economic opportunities, some Oshwals migrated to cities like Jamnagar and Mumbai.   Eking out a meagre living from farming, Oshwals learnt about economic opportunities in what was then British East Africa, and the first Halari Visa Oshwal, Mr Jetha Anand set out in 1896 and settled in Madagascar.  In 1898, Mr Hirji Kara, Mr Popatlal Vershi, Mr Devji Hirji and Mr Nathu Devji set out and settled in Kenya.  Following this a large number of Halari Visa Oshwals migrated to Kenya and settled in Mombasa as traders, gradually spreading to Nairobi and other towns as the building of the railway progressed in Kenya.  During the course, they also settled in Uganda and Tanzania.

History of Oshwals in the U.K.

The earliest Oshwal settlers to the UK were in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s.  Initially an informal social group was formed and the Oshwal community saw its early beginnings. The first migration from East Africa was in 1968, often referred to as “the exodus”, which saw the community increase in numbers , The main migration of Oshwals happened from 1968 and 1972 onwards.  Many, especially those expelled from Uganda, arrived with nothing.  To earn a living, the Oshwals, both men and women, took up employment in factories, shops, offices, London Transport etc with one driving ambition, to feed and educate their families and to provide a roof over their heads.  Gradually, following years of hard work, many were able to purchase their own homes, shops and start up small businesses.  At the same time, as the children grew up and pursued further education, a growing number of Oshwals took up jobs as professionals.  Up until the 1990s Oshwals who had retained British Citizenship continued to migrate from East Africa, making the UK their home. [Time line history to be provided]


Jainism

Oshwals are followers of the Jain faith, an ancient religion originating from India.  Jainism was preached by 24 Tirthankaras (liberated souls) of which Lord Mahavir was the 24thTirthankar and who propounded the current form of Jainism.

Mahavir

Lord Mahavir was born in 599 BCE in Bihar, India and was a prince.  At the age of 30 he gave up all attachment to worldly goods and family and took up the life of an ascetic.  After 12 and a half years of severe penance he achieved Keval Gnan (realization of perfect perception, knowledge, power, and bliss).  For the next 30 years, he travelled far and wide in India teaching the philosophy of the Jain faith.  In 527 BCE, at the age of 72, Lord Mahavir attained Nirvana (complete liberation from the cycle of life and birth)

Principles

Jainism teaches that the path to liberation from the cycle of life and birth is to live a life of harmlessness and renunciation.  Jain principles are set so that they can be practiced by ascetics, as well as lay members of the community with varying degrees of penance.  The very essence of Jainism is the concern of the welfare of every being within the Universe and for the health and welfare of the Universe.

Guiding Principles

Right Belief, Right Knowledge and Right Conduct

The 5 Great Vows

  • Ahimsa – Non violence towards all living creatures
  • Aparihagraha – Non- attachment to possessions and others
  • Satya – Truth
  • Asteya – Not Stealing
  • Brahmacharya – Sexual Restraint

By practicing these basic tenets, followers of the Jain faith believe that human kind will be able to live in peace and harmony with each other and with all living beings in the Universe.

An ardent follower of the principle of Ahimsa in modern times was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Mahatma Gandhi)


Want to see  Sayijan & Vidya full wedding photography gallery? just click here

4 Replies to “Sayijan & Vidya Wedding Oshwal Centre”

  1. OSHWAL POTTERS BAR WEDDING | HINDU WEDDING

    “We’re awe-struck…and I was driven to tears in the middle of Luton airport as we make our way to Geneva! Thank you so much Rahul, really! Everyone commented on how they loved pre-wed pics also! :)”

    The newly refurbished Oshwal Centre in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire was the setting for Sophia and Daniel’s Hindu wedding ceremony last week. It’s easy to see why Sophia chose this venue for her intimate wedding, because of the beautiful temple and grounds surrounding the Oshwal Centre. Sophia and Daniels wedding was full of colour, rituals, traditions and a range of emotions throughout the day, which I had the pleasure to photograph.

    I had a great time at Sophia & Daniel’s wedding at the Oshwal Centre in Potters Bar, and feel really lucky to have been able to document their wedding for them! Below are just a few of my favourite images from their day.

  2. Priya and Suraj’s Indian wedding at Oshwal Centre, Potters Bar
    It’s been a while since I’ve blogged, the 2011 summer wedding season has been amazing! I’ve photographed some beautiful weddings and one I really enjoyed was Priya and Suraj’s Indian wedding at the very popular Oshwal Centre in Potters bar. We were blessed with a gorgeous day, lots of sun, fun and a lot of smiles throughout the day.
    For your viewing pleasure, a few of the moments from Priya and Suraj’s big day.

  3. Hindu wedding at the Oshwal Centre, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire
    Posted in Asian Indian Wedding Photography,Asian Wedding Photographer London,Hertfordshire Wedding Photography
    The newly refurbished Oshwal Centre in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire was the venue for Divya and Anoop’s Hindu wedding ceremony in May. Oshwal Centre is a very popular wedding venue for Asian weddings because of the beautiful Jain temple and grounds surrounding the Centre, which provide a wonderful backdrop to any wedding. There aren’t many venues in and around London for Hindu weddings that boast such beautiful Indian architecture either and it was a pleasure to photograph Divya and Anoop’s wedding there.

    Anoop, a keen cyclist, arrived with his friends and family on a bike – a very different and entertaining arrival! He was welcomed by Divya’s family and was led to the mandap. The wedding takes place under the mandap, a decorated structure with four pillars representing the roles that Divya and Anoop’s parents have played in raising their children. As Divya made her entrance to the mandap, a cloth was placed in front of Anoop so that he could not see Divya. The wedding was full of colour, rituals, traditions, emotions, fun and laughter throughout the day.

    Thank you Divya and Anoop for choosing me to photograph your most important day. I hope that the memories I have captured bring back all of the fun and excitement from the beautiful day.

  4. I first met Akruti at a local fair where I was exhibiting. After a follow-up meeting with the couple, they asked me to cover their engagement ceremony in 2016. I had an amazing time capturing the event and getting to know both sides of the family. Both sides of the family were very welcoming, and I felt right at home!

    I was naturally very excited when they asked me to be part of their big day in March 2017! I was very impressed when Akruti told me that she is decorating her events and creating her centrepieces by using reclaimed wood from the local forest. Her aim was to create a nature inspired wedding decor by causing the least impact on the environment, and the results were stunning. Just have a look at some of the images from the wedding.

    SUPPLIERS

    Gayatri Weddings & Events
    Videography: Snapshot Cafe
    Music: D26
    Event Management: Trivium Events
    Catering: Swagat
    Car: Studio 434
    Hair & Make up: Aditi Raichura
    Mehendi: Jayshree Kapadia
    Mehendi Music: Calibar
    Mehendi Dhol: Prestige Sounds

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